Thalidomide | Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation

Thalidomide

Thalidomide is an old drug, though it has not been widely available since the 1960s, when it was found to cause birth defects.
Brand name: 
Thalomid
Bone Marrow Disease(s): 
myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)

Currently it is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in treating a skin disease associated with leprosy. Thalidomide is being studied, either as a single agent or in combination with other medicines, for treating of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). These clinical trials are studying the effectiveness and safety of the drug. A pilot study of thalidomide, published in 2001, found the drug improved blood counts in some patients and enabled others to become transfusion-independent. Thalidomide has some severe side effects which may limit its application as a treatment for MDS.

AAMDSIF does not recommend, endorse, or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any drug, treatment or therapy listed on this website. Some therapies listed on our site are considered experimental for the treatment of bone marrow failure diseases. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding any therapy, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.