Alemtuzumab | Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation

Alemtuzumab

A monocolonal antibody - a medicine that is engineered to look for a specific substance in the body. Alemtuzumab attaches to and kills white blood cells called lymphocytes. In certain types of aplastic anemia, lymphocytes are responsible for attacking the bone marrow stem cells. Alemtuzumab is in clinical trials for treating aplastic anemia. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating certain types of leukemia and is helpful in treating other conditions that require immunosuppressive therapy.
Brand name: 
Campath
Bone Marrow Disease(s): 
aplastic anemia

Alemtuzumab is a drug used in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and T-cell lymphoma under the trade names Campath, MabCampath and Campath-1H, and in the treatment of multiple sclerosis as Lemtrada. It is also used in some conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation, kidney transplantation and islet cell transplantation.

It is a monoclonal antibody that binds to CD52, a protein present on the surface of mature lymphocytes, but not on the stem cells from which these lymphocytes are derived. After treatment with alemtuzumab, these CD52-bearing lymphocytes are targeted for destruction.

Alemtuzumab is used as second-line therapy for CLL. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for CLL patients who have been treated with alkylating agents and who have failed fludarabine therapy. It has been approved by Health Canada for the same indication, and additionally for CLL patients who have not had any previous therapies.

(Mab)Campath was withdrawn from the markets in the US and Europe in 2012 to prepare for a higher-priced relaunch of Lemtrada aimed at multiple sclerosis.[1]

A complication of therapy with alemtuzumab is that it significantly increases the risk for opportunistic infections, in particular, reactivation of cytomegalovirus.

Related Clinical Trials

AAMDSIF does not recommend, endorse, or make any representation about the efficacy, appropriateness or suitability of any drug, treatment or therapy listed on this website. Some therapies listed on our site are considered experimental for the treatment of bone marrow failure diseases. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding any therapy, and never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.