Somatic mutations predict poor outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. | Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation

Somatic mutations predict poor outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

Journal Title: 
J Clin Oncol
Author(s): 
Bejar R, Stevenson KE, Caughey B, Lindsley RC, Mar BG, Stojanov P, Getz G, Steensma DP, Ritz J, Soiffer R, Antin JH, Alyea E, Armand P, Ho V, Koreth J, Neuberg D, Cutler CS, Ebert BL
Primary Author: 
Bejar R
Original Publication Date: 
Monday, September 1, 2014

PURPOSE:

Recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are pathogenic drivers and powerfully associated with clinical phenotype and prognosis. Whether these types of mutations predict outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with MDS is not known.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We used massively parallel sequencing to examine tumor samples collected from 87 patients with MDS before HSCT for coding mutations in 40 recurrently mutated MDS genes.

RESULTS:

Mutations were identified in 92% of patients, most frequently in the ASXL1 (29%), TP53 (21%), DNMT3A (18%), and RUNX1 (16%) genes. In univariable analyses, only TP53 mutations were associated with shorter overall (OS; hazard ratio [HR], 3.74; P < .001) and progression-free survival (HR, 3.97; P < .001). After adjustment for clinical variables associated with these end points, mutations in TP53 (HR, 2.30; P = .027), TET2 (HR, 2.40; P = .033), and DNMT3A (HR, 2.08; P = .049) were associated with decreased OS. In multivariable analysis including clinical variables, complex karyotype status, and candidate genes, mutations in TP53 (HR, 4.22; P ≤ .001) and TET2 (HR, 1.68; P = .037) were each independently associated with shorter OS. Nearly one half of patients (46%) carried a mutation in TP53, DNMT3A, or TET2 and accounted for 64% of deaths. Three-year OS in patients without these mutations was 59% (95% CI, 43% to 72%), versus 19% (95% CI, 9% to 33%) in patients with these mutations.

CONCLUSION:

Mutations in TP53, TET2, or DNMT3A identify patients with MDS with shorter OS after HSCT.

Bone Marrow Diseases: