Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization of cancer targets reveals novel, recurrent genetic aberrations in the myelodysplastic syndromes | Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation

Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization of cancer targets reveals novel, recurrent genetic aberrations in the myelodysplastic syndromes

Journal Title: 
Cancer Genet
Author(s): 
Kolquist KA, Schultz RA, Furrow A, Brown TC, Han JY, Campbell LJ, Wall M, Slovak ML, Shaffer LG, Ballif BC
Primary Author: 
Kolquist KA
Original Publication Date: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2011

The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, cytopenias, and a risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, only approximately 50% of primary MDS patients show clonal cytogenetic aberrations. To determine whether high-resolution microarray analysis would reveal new or additional aberrations, we analyzed 35 samples derived from patients with a diagnosis or suspicion of MDS and abnormal karyotypes. We used a whole-genome oligonucleotide microarray with targeted coverage of approximately 1900 genes associated with hematologic and other cancers. Clinically relevant copy number aberrations (CNAs) were identified by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in all samples (range 1-31, median 5). In 28 of 35 samples (80%), aCGH revealed new cytogenetic aberrations not seen by karyotype or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Furthermore, 132 cryptic aberrations (≤5 Mb) were identified in 25 cases (71.4%) including deletions of NF1, RUNX1, RASSF1, CCND1, TET2, DNMT3A, HRAS, PDGFRA and FIP1L1. Additionally, aCGH clarified known complex aberrations in 17 of 35 samples (48.6%). Finally, our results using whole-genome arrays with higher density coverage targeted to cancer features demonstrate the usefulness of arrays to identify rare and cryptic recurring imbalances that may prove to be significant in disease progression or transformation to AML and may improve the suitability or efficacy of molecularly targeted therapy.

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